02

2005-02 posts.

  1. 2005-02-03t17:27:16Z. RE: AI, Brain, Psychology, Robotics . Art 2D . Art 3D . Conservation . Cyber Life . Cyber Tech . Entertainment . Fishing, Hunting, Outdoors . Fun, Games, Play, Sports, Toys . Health . Martial Arts . Math, Science, Technology . Philosophy, Faith . Words .
  2. 2005-02-15t20:43:19Z. RE: Art 2D+time . Conservation . Cyber Life . Cyber Tech . Faith, Philosophy . Geography, History . Local . Martial . Math, Science, Technology . Politics . Quirky [Possibly NSFW] . Rambling . Relations [NSFW] . Words .
  3. 2005-02-22t04:45:49Z. RE: Art 2D . Art 2D+text . Art 2D+time . Art 3D . Conservation . Cyber Life . Entertainment . Faith, Philosophy . Food . Geography, History . Local . Math, Science, Technology . Quirky [Possibly NSFW] . Relations [SFW] . Relations [NSFW] . Words .

2005-02-03t17:27:16Z | RE: AI, Brain, Psychology, Robotics . Art 2D . Art 3D . Conservation . Cyber Life . Cyber Tech . Entertainment . Fishing, Hunting, Outdoors . Fun, Games, Play, Sports, Toys . Health . Martial Arts . Math, Science, Technology . Philosophy, Faith . Words .
2005-02-03t17:27:16Z

AI, Brain, Psychology, Robotics

  • Unnatural Selection
    • 'Physicists know a lot about Maxwell's equations and the other principles governing wireless communications. But antenna design is still pretty much a dark art, says Lohn, a computer scientist working at NASA Ames Research Center outside Mountain View, CA. "The field is so squirrelly. All your learning is through trial and error, the school of hard knocks." So why not automate trial and error? Antenna design, Lohn believes, is one of many engineering problems that could best be solved by evolutionary algorithms [aka GAs (genetic algorithms), adaptive algorithms], an emerging class of software that produces lots of different designs, rejecting the less fit in order to select the most functional. The resulting designs often seem a little inhuman--inelegant and uncanny.'
    • 'Breeding antennas takes time, of course. Most designs are downright awful, and it takes a large number of computing cycles to find decent performers. Still, when you've got a computer that can generate and test 1,000 generations an hour, interesting ideas do emerge*. Lohn, a PhD who hasn't taken a course on electromagnetism since his undergraduate years, expects to have at least one of his team's antenna designs go into space this year as part of NASA's Space Technology 5 mission, which will test a trio of miniature satellites. His favorite computer-designed antenna: a corkscrew contraption small enough to fit in a wine glass, yet able to send a wide-beam radio wave from space to Earth. It resembles nothing any sane radio engineer would build on her own.'
    • 'Goldberg focused his dissertation and then another half-decade of work on making genetic algorithms more predictable. He found that adjusting the parameters of each new algorithm--the starting population size or the rate of mutation, for example--smoothed out a few wrinkles. But for the most part, his research left him with a sobering realization: evolutionary algorithms were often more complex than the problems they tried to solve. Eventually, Goldberg learned to steer clear of what he calls "needle in the haystack" problems, which demand a single, best solution; these tended to cause evolutionary algorithms to spin out of control. Instead, he aimed at friendlier problems that had a range of viable solutions, depending on how you approached them. "If there are dozens of needles scattered around in such a way that the [evolutionary algorithm] can break the haystack down into smaller haystacks, you at least guarantee yourself a shot at a better outcome," Goldberg says.'
    • 'The circuit designs emerged from Koza's work with Matthew Streeter of Carne­gie Mellon University and Martin Keane of Econometrics, a marketing strategy consultancy based in Chicago. Together, the researchers built a program that draws schematic circuit diagrams. Their first challenge was to see whether the genetic approach could derive from scratch circuit designs already patented by past engineers. The program had little trouble generating simple designs that matched those patented in the 1930s and 1940s. Indeed, Koza began referring to the program as an "invention machine" and created a Web page that tracks the latest discoveries by "human competitive" software. By the time Koza's group tested the fourth or fifth versions of their program, however, something even more surprising began to happen: the program kicked out circuit designs unpublished anywhere in the patent literature. Two of these designs--a pair of controller circuits that regu­late feedback--were so original that Koza and his colleagues have taken out patents on them. As proud as he is of his software, Koza isn't about to assign responsibility for the new designs to the program itself. The patents credit Keane, Koza, and Streeter, in that order. But there are a few new pseudophilosophical conundrums lurking here: If something is invented with no human near, is it really an invention? Who is the inventor? And if the invention actually works, does it matter if we don't understand how?'

Art 2D

  • Looking Forward -- Paint.NET v2.1 [/.]
    • 'Paint.NET is image and photo manipulation software designed to be used on computers that run Windows XP or 2000. Paint.NET is jointly developed at Washington State University with additional help from Microsoft, and is meant to be a free replacement for the MS Paint software that comes with all Windows operating systems. The programming language used to create Paint.NET is C#, with GDI+ extensions.'
    • Ha ha! It's so funny to see all the /. geeks moan over their beloved GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) [W] and PhotoShop apps.
    • Why isn't anyone grieving over the loss of MS Paint? This is a simple little program that has been used by thousands for years. My daughter Connie just did a wonderful landscape complete with mountains and permafrost just the other day.
    • Brings up the whole .NET v Java argument because .NET GUI apps are not truly cross platform even if you take Mono into account.
  • Digital Picture Frames Reviewed. 'the digital picture frame, a flat-panel screen designed exclusively for showing digital photos. A digital frame can do something no ordinary frame can do: change what's in it at the touch of a button, or even treat you to a slide show. Think of it as a screen saver that doesn't tie up your computer.'
  • Frog Meets Mouse. An odd series of photos of a frog eating a young mouse from the photo book Food Chain [Amazon] by Catherine Chalmers.
    [PHOTO: Frog eating young mouse]
     

Art 3D

Conservation

  • Zoo may tell elephants farewell
    • Alas. I knew that different zoos were struggling over the keeping of elephants but I didn't know that it was hitting so close to home. I imagine many of the other animals also would prefer more space, a better climate, etc.
    • 'Having lost two of its three elephants in the last three months, Lincoln Park Zoo on Wednesday said it would send the last one to another facility while its staff re-examines the future of its elephant program.'
    • ' West suburban Brookfield Zoo has two extremely popular African female elephants and has never entertained the idea of doing away with its elephant exhibit, said zoo director Stuart Strahl. "Elephants are probably the most enigmatic and charismatic animals we have," said Strahl, "standing as representatives for the endangered and threatened wild species and habitat worldwide. ... The role of the zoo in a modern society is one of conservation and education. Our philosophy is that people care about wildlife and nature when they have meaningful, direct experiences with wildlife." '
  • Consensus on Global Warming [/.]
    • 'FredFnord writes "Well, here's an interesting one: the fine folks at Science Magazine have done an analysis of the last ten years' published scientific articles (articles from crank or non-peer-reviewed publications were not counted) on the subject of global climate change. The results themselves are interesting, but the most remarkable part was that, of the 928 papers they found, 75% accepted that global warming was caused by human activities, either explicitly or implicitly. 25% made no mention either way. And not a single paper asserted otherwise." JamesBell submits this article by a geologist which suggests that the Earth is in serious, imminent, unavoidable danger.'
    • None of this will matter one whit to the those who don't get it. While I will continue to hope and continue to try to inspire and inform, I have come to accept that a good many will just not get these sort of things until it really hurts. Many games go on until someone cries. The story of Easter Island repeats.
  • Green Energy Almost Cost-Competitive with Fossil Fuels [/.]
    • ' js7a writes "As reported in the Houston Chronicle, the sharply rising cost of natural gas and other fossil fuels has caused the cost of renewable energy to finally reach the price of nonrenewables. However, wind still has some catching up to do: 'a 10 percent wind- and 90 percent water-generated mix is about $9 per month less expensive than the 100 percent wind plan.' As more wind generation and grid transmission capacity is built, wind will eventually become more competitive than hydroelectric, but hydro and other sources will be required to balance grid demand in calm areas. Slashdot has been following this trend." '
    • See? There are reasons to be hopeful that we can change before we do too much damage. The fossil fuel industries must surely realize that alternative energy will replace fossil fuels but they don't want to do anything that will cut into their profits right now. I'm sure they have timetables on this switchover but if I were them I would err on the side changing gears sooner instead of later lest other companies replace them.
  • Major Climate Change Occurred 5,200 Years Ago: Evidence Suggests That History Could Repeat Itself
    • 'A professor of geological sciences at Ohio State and a researcher with the Byrd Polar Research Center, Thompson points to markers in numerous records suggesting that the climate was altered suddenly some 5,200 years ago with severe impacts.'
    • 'Thompson believes that the 5,200-year old event may have been caused by a dramatic fluctuation in solar energy reaching the earth. Scientists know that a historic global cooling called the Little Ice Age, from 1450 to 1850 A.D., coincided with two periods of decreased solar activity. Evidence shows that around 5,200 years ago, solar output first dropped precipitously and then surged over a short period. It is this huge solar energy oscillation that Thompson believes may have triggered the climate change he sees in all those records.'
    • '"Any prudent person would agree that we don't yet understand the complexities with the climate system and, since we don't, we should be extremely cautious in how much we 'tweak' the system," he said. "The evidence is clear that a major climate change is underway." '

Cyber Life

  • Search advertising
    • I've been doing a tiny bit of looking into driving traffic to websites via search engine advertising. Note that this is distinct from advertising on non-search engine sites. You should also manually list yourself in human-created directories (EG: DMoz.org) in addition to trying to make yourself searchable via robot-created search engines.
    • I've had a write up on search advertising via regular HTML already for years. This can be quickly summarized as follows:
      • Have a good <title>Clear and Concise</title>.
      • Make sure a summary is at the start of the visible document.
      • Have a good <meta name="description" content="Concise & accurate description, approx. 25 words." />.
      • Have a good <meta name="keywords" content="pet, pets, dog, cat, parrot, parot, pet supplies" />. Including phrases, plural & singular, and misspellings.
      • Use robots. See RobotsTXT.org.
      • Make sure your keywords are repeated in the content itself, esp. header tags.
      • Update your files and make it known via current copyrights and such.
    • The above will help in natural searches but there are also ways to pay search engines like Google and Yahoo so that you have a paid link show up on the side of natural searches.
      • Google.com/ads/. My main interest here is in Google AdWords. The program is simple:
        • $5 startup. Choose a maximum Cost-Per-Click (CPC) from $0.05 to $100. Minimum total of $20/month.
        • The neat thing is you only pay for per clicks per day.
        • Your ad is tied to key words that you choose. If no one else is paying for your keywords, then you'll get the lowest price.
      • Yahoo send's you to their child company Overture.com which focuses on search advertising. The Yahoo process is much more complicated than Google's. I hope the final price is similar. They do have a FastTrack service for $199 which studies your site and comes up with keywords and ad suggestions.
      • Lycos.com and other portals also make sponsored links and such.
    • There are two important things besides paying for your ads: Choosing your keywords and making your ad. The latter is not my concern, but there are several tools for selecting keywords:
      • Google's Keyword Sandbox. This is free and turns up lots of popular queries that include your keyword. It's a simple matter to type in keywords into Google and see what competitors if any have AdWords up.
      • Overture's Keyword Selector Tool. This is free and turns up search terms that others have done at Overture.com.
      • 50.Lycos.com. This is free. It turns up the top 50 searches at Lycos. This silly list usually has lots of pop stars (EG: "Britney Spears" has been on the list for 283 weeks!), but also has a lot of keywords for current popular memes (EGs: "Tsunami", "Taxes").
      • WordTracker.com. This site has a free trial but their service ranges from $8/day to $260/year. This site will give you numeric data that rates the popularity of keywords.
    • So unless you use Yahoo's FastTrack service, it seems that the process would be as follows:
      1. Come up with your own keywords.
      2. Use the free Google's Sandbox, Overture, and Lycos to drum up more keywords.
      3. Use WordTracker to quantify keywords.
      4. Finalize the keywords list based upon Google prices and such.
  • 2004 Year-End Google Zeitgeist: Search patterns, trends, and surprises. Nothing surprising since I lived through 2004 but it might be a fun historical reference. I see that Britney Spears is still #1 --a spot she's held since 2001 except for when Jennifer Lopez took it in 2002.
  • AOL Plans to Offer Free Webmail [/.]
    • ' UltimaGuy writes "AOL plans to offer a free webmail service to compete directly with Yahoo, Hotmail and Gmail. Does this mean AOL is trying to become something which it is not?" '
    • Talk about absurd. It's like privatizing Social Security: Dude! People already have the option of private investments or free webmail!
    • Why is AOL still alive? Primarily because they are riding on the momentum of a large customer base that they captured when the Web was young and customers didn't know any better.
  • Microsoft Loses Passport [/.]
    • Ha ha! One of many ideas that just wouldn't fly --reminds me of the "Briefcase" that Windows used to have on the desktop.
    • 'nikkoslack copies and pastes: "Microsoft is abandoning one of its most controversial attempts to dominate the Internet after rival companies banded together to oppose it and consumers failed to embrace it. The Redmond software company said Wednesday it would stop trying to persuade Web sites to use its Passport service, which stores consumers' credit-card and other information as Internet users surf from place to place." '
  • Introducing Children to Computers? [/. & > 800 comments]. I don't think we have to do anything other than let them use it. Kids will get interested in physics, medicine, language, music, etc., etc. It's just a matter of exposure.
  • Wikipedia Criticised by Its Co-founder [/.]
    • 'wikinerd writes "Wikipedia is under criticism by its co-founder Larry Sanger who has left the project. He warns of a possible future fork due to Wikipedia's Anti-Elitism and he presents his view on Wikipedia's (lack of) reliability. New wikis on various subjects have already emerged, with some of them being complete forks of Wikipedia. Critical articles on Wikipedia are also being published by other sources." '
    • Here are quotations from the Larry Sanger article:
      • 'Wikipedia does have two big problems, and attention to them is long overdue. These problems could be eliminated by eliminating a single root problem. If the project's managers are not willing to solve it, I fear a fork (a new edition under new management, for the non-techies reading this) will probably be necessary.'
      • 'First problem: lack of public perception of credibility, particularly in areas of detail. The problem I would like to point out is not that Wikipedia is unreliable. The alleged unreliability of Wikipedia is something that the above (TechCentralStation and AP) articles make much of, but that is not my point, and I am not interested in discussing that point per se.'
      • 'Second problem: the dominance of difficult people, trolls, and their enablers. I stopped participating in Wikipedia when funding for my position ran out. That does not mean that I am merely mercenary; I might have continued to participate, were it not for a certain poisonous social or political atmosphere in the project. '
      • 'The root problem: anti-elitism, or lack of respect for expertise. There is a deeper problem--or I, at least, regard it as a problem--which explains both of the above-elaborated problems. Namely, as a community, Wikipedia lacks the habit or tradition of respect for expertise. As a community, far from being elitist (which would, in this context, mean excluding the unwashed masses), it is anti-elitist (which, in this context, means that expertise is not accorded any special respect, and snubs and disrespect of expertise is tolerated). This is one of my failures: a policy that I attempted to institute in Wikipedia's first year, but for which I did not muster adequate support, was the policy of respecting and deferring politely to experts. (Those who were there will, I hope, remember that I tried very hard.) '

Cyber Tech

  • Contrarian finding: Computers are a drag on learning [/.]. It's contrarian but also common sense.
    • Computer games are a great distraction but computers have many other ways enabling procrastination.
    • There are many tasks that are not better done on a computer. EGs: Pouring liquids, talking, working with your hands, memorization.
    • Overall though, the computer advantages outweigh the dangers & disadvantages. The ability to research via Google, Wikipedia, etc. is phenomenal. Simple things like word processing and printing are taken for granted. As ever, this is more an issue of personal awareness and responsibilities than a problem with technology.
  • Developing for Healthcare - .NET vs J2EE? [/.]
    • Ha ha! The first response from /. was predictable: "ARGH!!!!!!".
    • Since I develop for the healthcare industry, this thread is of interest to me.
    • The OLAP multi-dimensional analytic analysis apps I've been working on have been proving to be too clever (or too politically dangerous) to sell. It also seems that the healthcare industry is not like other industries where the concern is from moving from 90% to 99% to 99.999999%. I think the healthcare industry would be satisfied with moving from 35% to 65% to 85%.
  • Great moments in microprocessor history. 'At the time of this writing, three groups lay claim for having been the first to put a computer in a chip: The Central Air Data Computer (CADC), the Intel® 4004, and the Texas Instruments TMS 1000.'
  • China launches new generation Internet
    • ' "We were a learner and follower in the development of the first generation Internet, but we have caught up with world's leaders in the next-generation Internet, become a first mover, and won respect and attention from the international community," said Wu Jianping, director of the expert committee of the China Education and Research Network (CERNET) and a mastermind in the development of the next-generation Internet in China. '
    • 'CERNET2 is the biggest next-generation Internet network in operation in the world and connects 25 universities in 20 cities. The speed in the backbone network reaches 2.5 to 10 gigabits per second and connects the universities at a speed of 1 to 10 gigabits per second. A trial on CERNET2 between Beijing and Tianjin on December 7 achieved a speed of 40 gigabits per second, the highest in the world in real applications. CERNET2 is also the first network based on pure Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) technology, one major characteristic between the current Internet and the next-generation Internet. '
    • Yes, as predicted, China is leap-frogging us in technology: Computers, space, etc.
  • What's Wrong with Unix? [/. & > 1000 comments]. Apparently the problem has to do with tech culture then tech.
  • Safe Personal Computing.
    • A dozen short and sweet tips.
    • 'Passwords: You can't memorize good enough passwords any more, so don't bother. For high-security Web sites such as banks, create long random passwords and write them down. Guard them as you would your cash: i.e., store them in your wallet, etc.'

Entertainment

Fishing, Hunting, Outdoors

  • Epic mako loses shark brawl in Atlantic
    • ' The shark battled for 40 minutes before angler Jamie Doucette, 28, of Wedgeport, Nova Scotia, saw its enormousness. "She felt pretty big," he recalls, "but it wasn't until she started pulling the boat off course that I started to worry." '
    • 'The fishermen estimated that it weighed up to 500 pounds, big enough to take the $3,000 in prize money, but when a forklift unloaded it, the fish weighed 1,082 pounds [491 Kg], a potential Canadian record.'
    • ' "I felt bad that we caught her at the prime of her reproductive cycle," says Doucette. "When they get to be this massive they call them queens of the sea. I would have let her go if I had been by myself, but it's different when you have four or five other guys on the boat. You've got to win." '
    • [PHOTO: Huge mako shark on a forklift]
    • Related: NewEnglandSharks.com/shortfin.htm

Fun, Games, Play, Sports, Toys

  • Childs Play I and II [/.]
    • Hilarious stuff! I like the title of the /. thread: "Whippersnappers Bad-Mouth Old Games"
    • Comment on Pong: 'Tim: I would never pay to play something like this.'
    • Comment on Defender: 'Bobby: I've played this on my cell phone.'
    • Comment on Galaga:
      • 'EGM: Now imagine you've reached the 10th stage, and you're on your last life. Once you die and you put another quarter in, you don't just continue from there-you start all over.
      • Parker: Are you serious?
      • EGM: Yup. When you lose all your lives, you have to start over. You don't keep going.
      • Parker: And you guys back then were OK with this?'

Health

  • I've started up a section on Health. My explorations include:
    • Inspiration and motivation for health. This is the first and most important thing about health. There are many reasons to be healthy and many ways to be healthy, but if you aren't motivated to be healthy, if you don't have fun and enjoyment, then you won't be healthy.
    • Basic anatomy. It's important to use consistent language to discuss the human body.
    • Basic physiology. We should know the basics of how the body works.
    • Kinesiology and exercise. I'm guessing that this will compromise the bulk of my health section. Variety, fun, and safety.
    • I have a bit on the healthcare industry since I work in it and since it affects everyone. The U.S. healthcare system is dangerously broken. My emphasis is on pre-emptive healthcare instead of reactive healthcare.
    • Diet. Eat less, eat a variety, eat slowly, drink more fluids. Your economic situation and environment affects your choices but the choice is yours.
    • Drugs. I don't smoke or do recreational drugs --heck I hardly even take over the counter drugs. I only occasionally drink alcohol or caffeine. It takes no effort for me to have these habits.
    • Sleep and rest. Listen to your body. Sleep well at night and take a nap if you need to. Too many people rely on drugs (like caffeine in coffee or tea) to overcome a lack of rest.
    • Stress and mindset. Use stress --don't let stress use you.

Martial Arts

  • I've been doing a bunch of things related to martial arts lately but one fun little thing worth mentioning is that the Guild has been playing with medicine balls. FYI: A medicine ball is a weighted soft leather ball.
    • We formed a circle and tossed a 5.4 Kg = 12 pound ball around. If you did a bad throw, then you had to do pushups. If you dropped the ball, then you did push ups. We did variations where the circle rotated, or where we had a "monkey" in the middle.
    • The guild also made up and played "Blind Medicine Volleyball". 'Stack up mats until they are about 7 feet up. Spread out 2 mats on each side of the "net" to make a semi-square "in-bounds" areas Same rules apply as in regular volleyball, (minus the 3 touches, usually it is a catch, toss over) Serves can't hit the nets, only score on your serves, untouched balls out of the receiving area are considered an "out" etc. We played to 7 pts, it was a nice number and we rotated after each set so the blindest player up front was constantly changing.'
    • There are other variations of playing with medicine balls. EG: U.S. President Herbert Hoover played "Hoover-Ball" with a 2.7 Kg = 6 pound ball over a 2.4 m = 8 foot volleyball net using roughly tennis rules.

Math, Science, Technology

  • The Gadget Gap: Why does all the cool stuff come out in Asia first? [/.]
    • Yes, it's true. The Japanese have stuff that's so bleeding edge that there is no U.S. market for them. This has been going on for years.
    • From the /. thread:
      • 'The Japanese, especially the young ones, have huge disposable incomes, as a result of a culture where it's normal to share a tiny apartment in the city with other families. Because of this, they tend not to invest of their incomes in more permanent things, like houses. This leaves them a lot of cash to spend on the latest gadgets, and the fact that they spend a lot of their time away from home gives them a reason to want a lot of personal/mobile electronics, especially cellphones and PDAs.

        Americans, on the other hand, usually have home ownership as their highest priority, and along with this, the most expensive home their income can afford them. A fat mortgage payment leaves little income to spend on gadgets that'll be obsolete in 6 months. It's even worse when you're spending what's left on the most expensive car payment you can afford.

        Personally, I think both ways are screwed up. The Japanese culture encourages a lot of consumerism and wastefulness: where do all those obsolete cellphones and other electronics go? And the American system is fairly wasteful and shortsighted too. With all the expensive cars people are buying, they're burning more oil than if they had older cars (look it up: vehicle fuel economy peaked in the 80's, and has been going down ever since). And by buying the most expensive houses possible, we have tons of McMansions going up, which use enormous amounts of energy to heat and cool. (I know someone with a McMansion, and his electric bill in the summer was typically over $500.) But another problem is that these people are all in debt up to their eyeballs, and when something bad happens, they lose their house and car and everything comes tumbling down.

  • Single-Planet Species Don't Last [/.]
    • 'An anonymous reader writes "Gemini, Apollo and Space Shuttle astronaut John Young, due to retire in two weeks, says that the human species is in danger of becoming extinct: 'The statistical risk of humans getting wiped out in the next 100 years due to a super volcano or asteroid or comet impact is 1 in 455. How does that relate? You're 10 times more likely to get wiped out by a civilization-ending event in the next 100 years than you are getting killed in a commercial airline crash.' He says that the technologies needed to colonize the solar system will help people survive through disasters on Earth. Young has written about this topic before in an essay called 'The Big Picture'." '
    • Ha ha! Talk about perspective.

Philosophy, Faith

  • Nonbelievers Organize in Fear of Bush White House and Republican Congress
    • 'Membership in the Washington-based American Humanist Association has jumped 5 percent since the election and 15 percent since January to reach the 7,000 mark.  The Secular Coalition for America has grown its lobbying fund from $8,000 a year ago to $50,000 today. At $100,000, the group intends to hire a lobbyist and possibly an administrative staffer. At the Los Angeles-based Atheist Alliance International, donations in November 2004 outpaced those of the prior three months put together as donors, apparently troubled by President Bush's re-election, began giving in four- and five-figure amounts.'
    • My "trivial" complaint is that Secular.org  is forming the SCA (Secular Coalition for America) which is distinct from the SCA (Society of Creative Anachronisms) of SCA.org. I realize that there may be overlap between the 2 orgs but sharing acronyms is confusing and generally not a good idea.
    • I also dislike the part of the title where it goes "Organize in Fear". True, the fear is there, but more important is the courage to fight for open minds. There is hope that humanity can learn and be honest. This is not a movement to destroy faith but to make it honest.

Words

  • Google To Digitize Much of Harvard's Library [/.]
    • ' FJCsar writes "According to an e-mail sent today to Harvard students, Google will collaborate with Harvard's libraries on a pilot project to digitize a substantial number of the 15 million volumes held in the University's extensive library system, which is second only to the Library of Congress in the number of volumes it contains. Google will provide online access to the full text of those works that are in the public domain. In related agreements, Google will launch similar projects with Oxford, Stanford, the University of Michigan, and the New York Public Library. As of 9 am on December 14, a FAQ detailing the Harvard pilot program with Google will be available at hul.harvard.edu." '
    • Sweet.
  • TextFiles.com. 'a glimpse into the history of writers and artists bound by the 128 characters that the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) allowed them. The focus is on mid-1980's textfiles and the world as it was then, but even these files are sometime retooled 1960s and 1970s works, and offshoots of this culture exist to this day.'
  • LindsayBks.com. 'Highest quality books, new and old, for experimenters, inventors, tinkerers, mad scientists, and a very few normal people.'

2005-02-15t20:43:19Z | RE: Art 2D+time . Conservation . Cyber Life . Cyber Tech . Faith, Philosophy . Geography, History . Local . Martial . Math, Science, Technology . Politics . Quirky [Possibly NSFW] . Rambling . Relations [NSFW] . Words .
2005-02-15t20:43:19Z

Art 2D+time

Conservation

Cyber Life

  • Maps.Google.com
    • Wow! Wicked cool. Dynamic interactive searchable maps.
    • I like the keyboard shortcuts too: Arrow keys, page up/down, home/end, +/-.
    • They sure have a lot of other things in beta such as Local.Google.com.
  • Just for the heck of it, here is the latest list of "categories" that I blog about.
    AI, Brain, Psychology, Robotics
    Art
    Art 2D
    Art 2D+text
    Art 2D+time
    Art 3D
    Art 3D+time
    Art Audio
    A v B
    Conservation
    Cyber Life
    Cyber Tech
    Entertainment
    Faith, Philosophy
    Food
    Personal (Family, Friends, Self)
    Fun, Games, Play, Sports, Toys
    Health
    History
    Journalism
    Local
    Martial
    Math, Science, Technology
    Measurements
    Money
    Obituaries
    Outdoors
    Politics
    Quirky [Possibly NSFW]
    Rambling
    Relations [SFW]
    Relations [NSFW]
    Words

Cyber Tech

  • Intel expects twins in the second quarter
    • Why just be "hard core" when you can be "dual core"! Whooot!
    • 'The chipmaker said Monday that it will launch a pair of dual-core processors for high-end desktops during the second quarter. In doing so, Intel narrowed the time frame for when its first dual-core chip will be available to consumers and businesses. Previously, the company had said only that it would be available in 2005.'
    • 'Intel will follow Extreme Edition with a standard dual-core desktop processor known by the code-name Smithfield. That chip will also come out during the second quarter, the representative said. ... Intel's PC rival, Advanced Micro Devices, has also said it will create chips with two, four and eight cores, starting with dual-core chips this year.'
    • Ha ha! Trying to compete with AMD again. Sweet.
  • Carly's Gone. HP Celebrates.
    • ' There was little love lost between the CEO and the 151,000 HP workers who have, almost consistently since 1999, made hating their boss a very personal, full-time mission. "When the news was officially announced this morning, people were dancing -- literally dancing -- around their cubicles," an employee in the business division writes in an email. '
    • ' "How do you expect people to make good products when you're constantly -- constantly -- working under the assumption that you'll be laid off soon," asks an employee from the personal computers division. "Every time we knew the quarterlies were close to being announced we'd brace ourselves for the latest round of layoffs. '
    • ' "Steve Jobs used to say that HP was the inspiration for Apple's emphasis on innovation," says a former HP Labs employee. "Fiorina never understood that you have to spend a little money to make money." ... "That's why HP went from a respected, innovative company that made quality products to one that makes most of its profits off printer ink." '

Philosophy, Faith

  • Reverend Rebecca [RevReb.com]
    • 'I am a minister in the liberal religious tradition ~ dedicated to the free and conscious search for truth. Bring your own beliefs and values with you and I will weave them into your ceremony. I am a graduate of the Unitarian-Universalist seminary in Chicago and have practiced as a Humanist minister since 1992, authorized to officiate weddings in all fifty states.'
    • I haven't looked around but it seems that there are humanist ministers out there.

Geography, History

Local

  • Sticking it to the Windy City.
    • Yay! Two out of the 12 stamps in the "Masterworks of Modern American Architecture" U.S. postage stamp series will be based on Chicago.
    • 'the mighty, X-braced John Hancock Center and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's pathbreaking steel-and-glass apartment high-rises at 860 and 880 North Lake Shore Drive.'
    • [PHOTOS: Chicago in part of a series of stamps]

Martial

Math, Science, Technology

Politics

  • North Korea Says It Has Nuclear Weapons. Ah, so that's where the WMDs are.
  • 'WalMart? Red. Costco? Blue. Vote with your wallet, shop in stores that support your political beliefs and stay away from stores that don't.
    Home Depot? Red. Circuit City? Red. JC Penney? Red. Sears, Staples, Walgreens? Red. So where's the blue? The Gap, CostCo, Bed Bath & Beyond, Barnes & Noble, Toyota (the only car maker to support Blue more than Red). They get Coors, Bud, Busch and Michelob but that's nicely balanced out by the Blue getting Guinness. The only anamoly I've found so far is Target, a Minnesota based company headed by a strong Democrat, is in the Red.
    Will this change anyone's shopping habits? I hope so.
    posted by fenriq ' [MeFi]
  • 'Democratic Transhumanism 2.0. A treatise by James Hughes, author of Citizen Cyborg. [Via WorldChanging.]
    posted by homunculus' [MeFi]
    • Interesting but transhuman issues are still pretty far away.
      [CHART: A political axes chart including Biopolitics]

Quirky [Possibly NSFW]

Rambling

  • Existence as systems of objects.
    • First a review of the "objects" idea which is similar to the Platonic concept of "forms" but here is largely based upon object-oriented programming.
      • A class is a template which can be used to instantiate, i.e. make specific manifestations of the class called objects. This is  EG: A nose class is instantiated as the specific nose object on your face.
      • A class can have a child-class based upon its parent-class, ad infinitum. EG: The shape class has sub-classes of rectangle and circle; The rectangle class has sub-classes of square and golden; etc.
      • Objects have different properties or parts with values. EG: A car object has the property of color with the value of blue. A property of an object may be another object or collection of objects. EG: A car object has a collection of wheel objects.
      • Things that objects can do are called methods and it takes parameters that tell it how to do it. EG: A car has a method to stop and how hard the brake pedal is pressed.
      • How an object works is encapsulated. You do not need to know what is inside an object to see the object, experience the object, have the object do what it does.
    • Explorations into the concept.
      • How objects interrelate with other objects is a complex system, but the laws that themselves may be seen as classes/objects. There are more general laws (EG: The gravity law is an object that influences all other nodes with mass), but there are more specific laws (EG: The rules of chess apply to chess objects.).
      • A system of objects may naturally designed, self-designing, interactively designed/modified, adaptively designed, chaotically designed, self-organized, etc.
      • A system of objects may cover almost any kind of system: Philosophical, spiritual, religious, sports, astronomy, molecular, domestic, personal, etc.
      • An object may be of multiple classes in multiple systems of objects. Most objects are part of many systems: some of this participation is by choice.
      • Just because an object has systems available does not mean that the object can use the systems effectively. Some objects (or users of objects who are themselves objects) may synergize systems/objects better than others for many reasons. EG: The object is built better (EG: Genetics); the object has acquired access to more powerful systems (EG: Education); the object was luckier (EG: The probability bell curve); the object has practice and experience.
      • Natural and real systems.
        • Natural or real world systems are deeply encapsulated. How the world works and what the world really is is a hard subject. For all we know reality is a sort of Mandelbrot with infinite systems in infinite directions.
        • We create artificial or virtual systems to model real systems. The generation of virtual systems modeling real systems is reverse engineering done by reasoning, intuition, and testing. Of course real systems can be generated too. EG: A system for doing the dishes.
        • Virtual systems can be rich and complex systems. A virtual system can also be incomplete: It does not have to describe the entire universe. Virtual systems also do not have to model real systems: A virtual system can have its own objects and rules.
        • Sometimes "Frankenstein" systems are created, i.e. virtual systems that are ugly mockeries of natural systems.
      • Systems interact against each other over time. Some systems evolve and survive, but others do not. When a system conflicts with a larger system, one has to give.
        • A virtual system may not be "real", but it had better work or be satisfying in order to persist.
        • Virtual systems must be tested against real systems over time.
        • Science tests every hypothesis against nature: Newton's theories had to be mended by Einstein's theories in order to survive colliding with tests against nature.
        • Many religion systems falter when conflicting with natural systems. EG: Christianity was heliocentric and squashed Galileo --but in the end Galileo was right and it was Christianity that had to change. Puritanical systems that deny man's naughty nature will run into problems. Christianity grew by squashing, absorbing, and adapting to other religions it encountered.
        • Systems may persist for a relatively long time but sometimes they persist through patches.
        • A system of illegal behavior fails when it finally conflicts with the legal system. Similarly anti-social behavior is usually squashed by social behavior.
      • It is important to understand the limitations and possibilities of models and systems
        • Some objects can only affect other objects within nodal proximity. Some objects are only concerned with objects within nodal proximity. On the other hand even the tiniest of objects can have great affects.
        • Seek the objects, methods, etc. that will have greater affects or affect more objects or both. If such means do not exist, then it may be an opportunity to create the means.
        • Usually models have good qualities and seeds of truth but be constantly aware of models that over reach or the bad application of models. EGs: Numerology, astrology, humors, qi, most religions, etc.
      • Viewing everything as object systems has these benefits:
        • Improved analysis and synthesis of different systems.
        • A deeper understanding of systems.
        • The possibility to create new systems, esp. to do paradigm shifts.
        • Acceptance of change and cutting down on fixation, while having more honest dynamic models within frameworks of immense systems.
        • Improvements in systems is can be viewed as the destruction of a system but a better outlook is to see it as the evolution of systems.

Relations [NSFW]

  • SexyLosers.com
    • I stumbled upon this site while checking up on comic strips at High5.net/comic. This is a dirty humor site done in Japanese Manga style. It is surprisingly good --once you get over all the excess. The odd cohesion that develops over many panels is fascinating. After reading all 235 strips free online, the shock value disappeared but the interest in characters and plot increased.
    • Observations:
      • Who would have thought that necrophilia could be so funny? The tale of Shiunji Watanabe and The Suicide Girl (Yuko Ishida) was the longest and he does leave you longing for more.
      • Who would have thought that masturbation mastery could be so funny? Oddly enough you come to respect Mike for following his Way/Do/Tao.
      • I now have the power of "fap fap fap" and "shlick shlick shlick" as onomatopoeias for male and female jerking off respectively.
      • Poop and pee sex is disgusting but... on the other hand... no, no... it's still disgusting. I can deal with bodily wastes as a biological necessity but it's not personal turn on.
      • I now know a bit more about bukkake and Dutch Wives.
    • [ART: A few panels from SexyLosers.com]

Words

  • Sorting through my books.
    • One of my five bookcases died on me the other day so I got more shelves and I've been going through my books a bit.
    • Most of my books, in no particular order, are on science, math, biology, engineering, history, literature, science fiction, language, foreign languages, martial arts, health, philosophy, faith, art, finances, references, crafts, music, and computers. Of my books, it seems that the computer books have the highest rate of becoming useless.
    • I hate to throw out books because I love books. In one sense books that I own are like trophies of the mind. I think books in a house also provide a presence, a physical reminder of different worlds of words and pictures. However sometimes I need to get rid of books. I've moved around a lot and my many book boxes always seemed the densest. Some books have become so worn that they are unreadable.
    • Here is an example of a book I had to consider. This was my copy of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (New York, NY: Ballantine Books, 1983. 75th printing). While I have a lovely leather bound version of the trilogy (as well as a newer paperback version of the trilogy), my old $2.95 paperback copies with the colorful covers have sentimental value to me. I've read these copies several times. I remember reading the Hobbit and the trilogy and the appendices in one day and a late night. I still do not know whether I will throw out these tattered books (some are missing their covers entirely) but if I do, then in addition to my memories, I will have this scan of the book.
      [THUMBNAIL: Cover of my old copy of LOTR]

2005-02-22t04:45:49Z | RE: Art 2D . Art 2D+text . Art 2D+time . Art 3D . Conservation . Cyber Life . Entertainment . Faith, Philosophy . Food . Geography, History . Local . Math, Science, Technology . Quirky [Possibly NSFW] . Relations [SFW] . Relations [NSFW] . Words .
2005-02-22t04:45:49Z

Art 2D

  • Miss Digital World [MissDigitalWorld.com]. Most of the digital girls are pretty lame now but it's bound to get better.
  • The Vincent van Gogh Gallery [vanGoghGallery.com]. 'I'm proud to say that I have the privilege of displaying 100% of Vincent van Gogh's works and letters--a complete, online catalogue raisonné of Van Gogh's oeuvre. As you explore these pages, you'll see the culmination of thousands of hours of work. But that's just the beginning'
  • Baaaaaby Animals
    • 'The cutest community ever.'
    • 'It's easy to do. You just enter an lj-cut linking to a baaaaaaaaaaby animal, and then have the picture of an adorable baby animal that makes everyone go "awwwwwwwww" and makes their day better. Then those people go out and make four or five other people's days better, and those people pass it on to four or five, and so on until eventually there is no more war because people are overwhelmed with cuteness, at which time the baby animals will rise against us and take their place as the rightful rulers of the planet. It's like a pyramid scheme of cuteness, but with a twisty ending.'
    • Aaackkk! Pffbbt! Too dang cute!
      [PHOTO: fluffy kitten ball]

Art 2D+text

Art 2D+time

Art 3D

  • Pierced Eyeglasses
    • Cool!
    • Q: "How did you come up with the idea of attaching a pair of glasses to a piercing?"
      A: " I'm not sure... some time during the drooling days of high school the idea came to me. I kept it in mind over the years and got the bridge piercing this July and then started looking to make it happen. Maybe it had something to do with not being able to wear contacts. "
      • Ha! Frank Miller did floating glasses in Ronin, DC Comics, 1983! But perhaps James Sooy came up with the idea independently.
    • [PHOTO: Eyeglasses pierced into your nose]

Conservation

  • Lobster Liberation [LobsterLib.com] [MeFi]
    • 'Most people feel uncomfortable about cooking and eating lobsters--and for good reason: Like all animals, lobsters can feel pain, and they suffer when they are cut, broiled, or boiled alive. Boiling lobsters alive is illegal in Reggio, Italy. Offenders face fines of up to $600.'
    • Reminds me of the Futurama episode where they couldn't help eating the young of this advanced alien race because they were so delicious.

Cyber Life

Entertainment

Faith, Philosophy

  • "Why Hast Thou Forsaken Me?": How would you answer the Baby Jesus?. Ha ha ha ha! These are some pretty lame Christians.
  • 'Don't put a restraining order on God the toughest challenge of living in a democracy is to respect the freedom of other people to live according to values that are not your own. Real freedom, however, does not thrive in a moral vacuum (the ardent secularist) or a moral straightjacket (the ardent theocratic). What does my ideal of democracy look like? I can sum it up in a single sentence: A person arrives at faith freely, practices it openly, and uses dialogue with others about their own life path to deepen their understanding. another interesting read from the same webpage: God is not a Republican or a Democrat: the Religious Right does not speak for you. Remind America that Jesus taught us to be peacemakers, advocates for the poor, and defenders of justice.. this article is a little dated, but it is relevant for people who choose to accept Jesus as the Christ but do not want someone's political agenda attached to their belief system.
    posted by Hands of Manos' [127 comments on MeFi]
    • These Christians are more sensible.
  • Blue-state philosopher: Same-sex marriage? Euthanasia? Child's play issues in the avant-garde philosophy of Peter Singer, the "most influential" philosopher alive [MeFi]
    • But will stuff like this get people to think? --or just lamely react? Shameful for the site to take things out of context.
  • God Checker [Godchecker.com]. 'We have more Gods than you can shake a stick at. Godchecker's Mythology Encyclopedia currently features over 2,000 deities.'
  • Science in the Bible. Sheer fun mockery of Bible literalists.
  • Pagan Travel Network [PaganTravel.net]
    • 'Witch & Famous Cruises caters to the Pagan traveler interested in getting up close and personal with some premiere Pagan authors and luminaries. Witch & Famous Cruises is the specialty cruise arm of the Pagan Travel Network -- a cruise-only agency located in North Aurora, IL. Owner and operator, Mike Smith, a Pagan since 1993, hopes to unite the Pagan community by bringing like-minded Pagans together with its elders.'
    • Take me to Oz!
  • The slackers' manifesto: Is slacking a blight on business productivity, or could it be a rational response to the hypocritical corporation? [MonkeyFilter]
    • ' Subtitled "The art and necessity of doing the least possible in a corporation", Bonjour Paresse is a riposte to the motivational and management books of the Who Stole the Seven Habits of Highly Successful Rich Dads variety. More than a satire, the book is also a clarion call to white-collar workers. Its author, Corinne Maier, told the Financial Times in August: "Businesses don't wish you well and don't respect the values they champion. This book will explain why it's in your interest to work as little as possible and how to screw the system from within without anyone noticing." '
      • Ah grasshopper. "Slacker" and "Lazy" are insulting words used by those who do not understand The Dao of Easy. Continue in your studies for what you have gained so far is a mere shadow of the Way. The Art of Corporate Slacking (of which Wally of Dilbert is a master) is but one side of The Way.
    • 'Slackers are not no-hopers or even obviously difficult employees; they do well in their performance appraisals and some even get promotions. That is the point: they have mastered the art of looking like they are doing a good job, while doing as little actually productive labor as possible.'
    • '1 You are a modern-day slave. There is no scope for personal fulfilment. You work for your pay cheque at the end of the month, full stop.

      2 It is pointless to try to change the system. Opposing it simply makes it stronger.

      3 What you do is pointless. You can be replaced from one day to the next by any cretin sitting next to you. So work as little as possible and spend time (not too much, if you can help it) cultivating your personal network so that you are untouchable when the next restructuring comes around.

      4 You are not judged on merit, but on whether you look and sound the part. Speak lots of leaden jargon: people will suspect you have an inside track.

      5 Never accept a position of responsibility for any reason. You will only have to work harder for what amounts to peanuts.

      6 Make a beeline for the most useless positions, (research, strategy and business development), where it is impossible to assess your 'contribution to the wealth of the firm'. Avoid on-the-ground operational roles like the plague.

      7 Once you have found one of these plum jobs, never move. It is only the most exposed who get fired.

      8 Learn to identify kindred spirits who, like you, believe the system is absurd through discreet signs (quirks in clothing, peculiar jokes, warm smiles).

      9 Be nice to people on short-term contracts. They are the only people who do any real work.

      10 Tell yourself that the absurd ideology underpinning this corporate activity cannot last forever. It will go the same way as the communist system.'

      • I have come to appreciate the truths to be found even in half-truths.
  • "Quitting The Paint Factory: On the virtues of idleness" By Mark Slouka
    • ' Ah, but here's the rub: Idleness is not just a psychological necessity, req­uisite to the construction of a complete human being; it constitutes as well a kind of political space, a space as necessary to the workings of an actual democracy as, say, a free press. How does it do this? By allowing us time to figure out who we are, and what we believe; by allowing us time to consider what is unjust, and what we might do about it. By giving the inner life (in whose precincts we are most ourselves) its due. Which is precisely what makes idle­ness dangerous. All manner of things can grow out of that fallow soil. Not for nothing did our mothers grow suspicious when we had "too much time on our hands." They knew we might be up to something. And not for nothing did we whisper to each other, when we were up to something, "Quick, look busy." '
      • Ah grasshopper. "Idleness" and "Introspection" are mere stepping stones to the Natural Way of Easiness. Examine further.

Food

  • Customized M&Ms. Brilliant, brilliant! Choose your own color scheme, imprints, quantities, etc.
    [PICTURE: customized M&Ms]
  • Tastes Like Chicken?
    • 'The field of culinary evolution faces one great dilemma: why do most cooked, exotic meats taste like cooked Gallus gallus, the domestic chicken?'
      • We just say that it tastes like chicken to trick someone into eating something new... like human flesh!!!
    • [CHART: tree of flesh tastes]

Geography, History

  • Modern human form gets 35,000 years older
    • 'A new study concludes that the earliest known humans appeared in southern Ethiopia about 195,000 years ago, about 35,000 years earlier than had previously been thought. That conclusion is based on what researchers say are the oldest anatomically modern human fossils ever found.'
    • 'Study co-author John Fleagle, a professor of anatomical sciences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook , said the research fits well with evidence that the last of our genes became fully distinct from other primates about 200,000 years ago. It supports other genetic studies showing that the bulk of human genetic diversity occurring since then is found within Africa, before inhabitants began emigrating to the Middle East, Europe and Asia about 50,000 years ago.'
    • 'G. Philip Rightmire, a paleoanthropologist at the State University of New York at Binghamton , said he believes the Omo fossils show Homo sapiens and a more primitive ancestor. The find appears to represent the aftermath of the birth of Homo sapiens, when it was still living alongside its ancestral species, he said.'
  • 'The Greek Dark Age remains a mystery. Between 1100 to 800 BC, the written record in Greece ceased altogether. Urban culture was decimated, and art reverted to a more primitive form of simple geometrics. Civilization reverted to a basic subsistence lifestyle. What happened? Nobody's really sure, but many theories abound. Get the quick and dirty with this great kids writeup. Even the controversial author Velikovsky wrote a treatise on the subject.
    posted by rolypolyman' [MonkeyFilter]

Local

Math, Science, Technology

Quirky [Possibly NSFW]

Relations [SFW]

  • 'Donations appreciated... "The male species is doomed, says Bryan Sykes, professor of human genetics at Oxford University. And a woman-only world is possible." More here, and here.
    posted by docpops' [MeFi]
    • 'The problem is that the Y-chromosome has never been able to heal itself. Unlike X-chromosomes, which pair up and swap genes to minimise bad mutations, the Y-chromosome, which has no partner, cannot repair the damage inflicted by mutations, which keep accumulating. Like the face of the moon, still pitted by craters from all the meteors that have ever fallen onto its surface, Y-chromosomes cannot heal their own scars. It is a dying chromosome and one day it will become extinct.'
      • Alas! We men had better look in the mirror while we still can.
    • 'Male infertility is on the increase. An astonishing 7% of men are either infertile or sub-fertile. There are a whole host of causes but a substantial proportion, that is between 1% and 2% of all men, are infertile because of mutations on their Y-chromosomes. That is an astonishingly high figure. The human Y-chromosome is crumbling before our very eyes. There is no reason to think things will improve -- quite the reverse, in fact. One by one, Y-chromosomes will disappear until eventually only one remains. When that chromosome finally succumbs, men will become extinct. But when? By my estimate, the fertility caused by Y-chromosome decay drops to 1% of its present level within 5,000 generations, which is about 125,000 years. Not exactly the day after tomorrow -- but equally, not an unimaginably long time ahead.'
      • 125,000 years? Why that's plenty of time to kill ourselves.

Relations [NSFW]

  • Length-boosting surgery for 'micro-penises' [MeFi]
    • 'A new surgical procedure has allowed men with abnormally short penises to enjoy a full sex life and urinate standing up, some for the first time. Tiny "micro-penises" have been enlarged to normal size without losing any erogenous sensation, say UK doctors.'
    • 'To preserve erogenous sensation, he also cut the tip of the penis - called the glans - away from the main shaft, while leaving the blood vessels and nerves intact. While still being connected to the blood vessels and nerves of the micro-penis, the glans was sewn back to the outside end of the new penis. Arteries, veins and nerves from the pelvis were also joined to supply the new penis.'
    • They shuffle skin from the arm to the penis, and from the butt to the arm. It sounds like this could be used to enlarge any penis.
    • Of course the MeFi is gleefully filled with all sorts of wise cracks.
  • 'Mom finds out just how kinky you really are? Prepare for the consequences: phone calls, awkward questions, threats, revelations, and some stuff you don't want to hear. Get ready for the tough questions, and a conversation you'd definitely like to forget. Advice? Just accept it. Is it easy? No.'
    posted by Paddle to Sea' [MeFi]
    • Umm... ewww. Real or fantasy?

Words

  • 'Das machine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und corkenpoppen mit spitzensparken. Ist nicht fur gewerken by das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren keepen hands in das pockets. Relaxen und vatch das blinkenlights!!!'
    • He he he.
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